Specialty Program

Pelvic Health

Specialty Program

Pelvic Health

Specialty Program

Pelvic Health

Specialty Program

Pelvic Health

Specialty Program

Pelvic Health

Pelvic floor dysfunction can cause challenges ranging from urinary incontinence to painful intercourse – issues that can be stressful to deal with and hard to talk about. But caring, expert help is available. Make an appointment with one of our specialized pelvic health therapists and get back to feeling like yourself again.

We can help with incontinence, pelvic pain, sexual dysfunction and more.

Pain during sex and urinary incontinence are issues that can be hard to talk about. However, they are a reality for many women. These symptoms can have a profound impact on quality of life and personal relationships.

Specialized physiotherapy is the first line of defense against such problems according to well-established research and clinical guidelines. We can help you get back to life.

Did you know?

  • 1 in 4 women suffer from some form of bladder leakage
  • 1 in 3 women experience pain during intercourse
  • 2 out of 3 women with chronic low back pain have unresolved pelvic floor dysfunction
  • Bladder and bowel incontinence
  • Urgency
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Pelvic pain
  • Pre-natal & post partum pelvic problems
  • Painful intercourse
  • Constipation
  • Chronic low back & tailbone pain
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Nearly 15% of women aged 18 to 50 yrs old suffer from chronic pelvic pain and on average seek help from 3 or more medical doctors. Despite this, 61% of sufferers still have no diagnosis

  • Vulvodynia
  • Coccydynia
  • Vestibulodynia
  • Dyspaerunia
  • Pudendal neuropathy
  • Levator ani syndrome
  • Pelvic floor tension myalgia
  • Vaginismus
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Endometriosis
  • Pain in the vagina, perineum or rectum
  • Pain in your bladder region
  • Difficulty starting your urine stream
  • Losing control of your bowels or bladder
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Itching/stinging in your vulva/vagina with or without infection
  • Chronic urinary tract infections

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions you may have chronic pelvic pain. Our pelvic health therapists can help.

Pelvic organ prolapse is a disorder described as an annoying protrusion at or near the vaginal opening, which may or may not be accompanied by perineal pressure. It is aggravated by standing and relieved by lying down. It may cause problems such as urine retention and alter bowel function.

  • Cystocele – falling of the bladder
  • Uterine Prolapse – descent of the uterus
  • Urethrocele – descent of the urethra
  • Rectocele – rectal wall pushes into the vagina
  • Enterocele – intestines descend into the vagina

Grading of Prolapse

  • Grade 1: descent of organ into vagina
  • Grade 2: descent of organ to vaginal opening
  • Grade 3: descent of organ through vaginal opening
  • Grade 4: inversion of the affected organ through the vagina

Treament

  • Grade 1 & 2 – Conservative care including postural education, lifting techniques, pelvic floor muscle retraining and reduction of constipation can reverse the prolapse to a Grade 1 level
  • Grade 3 & 4 – Surgical intervention is usually required. Since there is a high incidence of multiple surgeries it is imperative that women strengthen their pelvic floor and learn about preventative measures to minimize chance of more surgery.

Ask yourself these questions:

  • Do you have heaviness in your vagina or rectum?
  • Do you have difficulty initiating your urine flow?
  • Do you have to strain in order to have a bowel movement or urinate?
  • Do you have discomfort/pain during intercourse?
  • Does it feel like your “insides” are falling out?
  • Are you constipated?
  • * If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions you may suffer from Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Urinary Incontinence is common, especially for woman. Nearly half of the women experiencing urinary incontinence are between 35 and 54 years of age.

The International Continence society has evidence stating that pelvic health physiotherapy should be the first line of treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence in women.

Our treatment program typically consists of internal assessment and treatment of your pelvic floor muscles, as well as a tailored exercise program aimed at improving control and awareness of your pelvic floor muscles in order to eliminate incontinence.

Causes of Incontinence in Women

  • Weakening of the pelvic floor muscles
  • Trauma due to pregnancy, labour and delivery
  • Prolapse of pelvic organs
  • A consequence of surgery
  • Changes due to aging and menopause

Physiotherapy for urinary incontinence might include:

  • Progressive strengthening exercises
  • Connective tissue massage
  • Myofascial trigger point release
  • Bladder retraining
  • Behavioural techniques
  • Electrical muscle stimulation
  • Biofeedback
  • Manual therapy techniques
  • Education

Studies have shown that you cannot learn to do Kegel exercises effectively through a handout or verbal instructions. One visit with a specially trained physiotherapist that teaches Kegel with internal palpation is significantly more effective.

The Canadian Continence Society estimates that the average woman with incontinence spends $1,000 every year on incontinence products. Pelvic Health is a good investment in your future health, and will save you money over the long term.

We can help with incontinence, prostate issues, sexual dysfunction and more.

Incontinence, prostate problems and sexual dysfunction can be stressful issues to deal with and difficult to talk about. But our caring experts are here to help. Pelvic health rehabilitation is a safe, drug-free treatment that has been proven effective by high level research.

Did you know?

  • 1 in 7–9 men experience pelvic pain
  • 1 in 9 men leak urine
  • 1 in 3 men with chronic low back pain have unresolved pelvic floor dysfunction.
  • Bladder and bowel incontinence
  • Urgency
  • Constipation
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Pre and post op prostate surgery
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Difficulty initiating or stopping urine flow, slow stream, pain with urination
  • Leaking when you cough, sneeze, walk, run, lift or after finishing urinating
  • Urgently or frequently going to the bathroom (more than 8 times a day)
  • Persistent pain in your low back, tailbone, testicles, penis or rectum
  • Difficulty or pain with bowel movements
  • Difficulty holding gas or stool
  • Difficulty maintaining an erection
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Prostadynia (pain in the prostate region)
  • Prostatitis (inflammation &/or infection)
  • Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (enlargement of prostate)
  • Non-inflammatory Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

Prostatectomy is the surgery commonly performed in the treatment of prostate cancer, which involves removal of the prostate, seminal vesicles and surrounding tissue. This can negatively affect a man’s sexual and urinary functions and result in pelvic pain.

Radiation therapy is also commonly used to combat cancer and when it is directed to the pelvis area it can cause long lasting damage to the nerves and vessels of the penis. Some men will have some erectile dysfunction following radiation therapy.

Some reasons for post-prostatectomy incontinence and pelvic pain may include: weakened pelvic floor muscles, poor co-ordination or dysfunctional muscles and scar tissue development.

Our specialty trained pelvic health therapists commonly assess and successfully treat these conditions. In fact, many specialists are referring those awaiting prostate surgery for a pre-op consultation with the pelvic health physiotherapist to improve their understanding and outcomes post-op.

Men can take an active role in their recovery from these difficult and damaging cancer treatments, with some guidance from a qualified pelvic health physiotherapist.

Urinary Incontinence is not a disease, it is a symptom of pelvic floor dysfunction. Over 1.5 million Canadians have experienced loss of bladder control in the past year.

Causes of incontinence in men

  • Consequence of surgery
  • Occupational heavy lifting
  • Chronic respiratory or neurological conditions
  • Changes due to aging & weakening pelvic floor
  • Certain medications

Physiotherapy for urinary incontinence might include:

  • Progressive strengthening exercises
  • Connective tissue massage
  • Myofascial trigger point release
  • Bladder retraining
  • Behavioural techniques
  • Electrical muscle stimulation
  • Biofeedback
  • Manual therapy techniques
  • Education

Although urinary incontinence is common, it should not be considered a normal part of aging. Physiotherapy for urinary incontinence is effective 80-90% of the time.

The initial assessment takes about an hour. Your physiotherapist will review your questionnaire and talk to you about your medical history.

After your initial assessment, your therapist will estimate how many treatments you may require and create a treatment program tailored to your needs. How fast you see results depends on your commitment to practicing the at-home exercises your physiotherapist will assign. However, on average, treating straightforward incontinence can take 5–6 treatments.